Lethal Beauty – Easter Lilies

Easter Lily is the common name for Lilium longiflorum

The Easter holiday brings us Easter egg hunts, family, sunny spring days, and Easter lilies. The later of these joys can have a dark side. Potential fatal lilies are true lilies of the Lilium or Hemerocallis species. Examples of some of these dangerous lilies include the tiger, day, Asiatic hybrid, Japanese Show, stargazer and Western lilies – all of which are highly toxic to cats! One of the most popular of these true lilies would be the Easter lily.

Easter lilies may be beautiful to look at but they can be a serious hazard to your pet.  Even small ingestions (such as 2-3 petals or leaves) – even the pollen or water from the vase – can result in severe, acute kidney failure. If your cat has ingested any part of the lily and they do not receive medical attention immediately, it can become fatal in as little as three days.

 

What are the signs of lily toxicity?

  • Drooling
  • Vomiting (watch for pieces of plant in the vomit)
  • Decreased appetite
  • Increase in urination, followed by lack of urination after 1-2 days
  • Dehydration
  • Disorientation
  • Seizures
  • Death

How do I prevent my cat from becoming ill?

If possible, do not have lilies in your home, not even as cut flowers. If you do have lilies in your house – make sure your cat cannot reach them and inform everyone in your household of the dangers lilies pose to sweet little Mittens.

My cat may have eaten some lily leaves – what do I do?

  • Immediately bring your cat and the lily to your veterinarian.
    • There are other species of lilies, peace and calla lilies for example, that are less toxic. However, these species can still make your pet very ill. Proper identification of the lily can help your veterinarian select a treatment plan.
  • If your cat has recently ingested the plant material, and has not vomited, your veterinarian will induce vomiting. Activated charcoal will be given orally to absorb any toxin that may remain in the gut.
  • The key to survival is high volumes of IV fluids – usually for 24-48 hours.
  • During this time monitoring of your pet’s kidney values and urine output will be monitored.
  • If treatment is successful, there are no reported long-term consequences. It’s still a good idea to monitor for any changes in urination for a time after exposure.

Be especially vigilant during the Easter season. Easter lilies may smell lovely, but they can be lethal beauties.

 

For more information please visit:

https://www.petmd.com/cat/emergency/poisoning-toxicity/e_ct_lily_poisoning

https://www.petpoisonhelpline.com/poison/lilies/

https://www.poison.org/articles/2007-mar/what-you-dont-know-about-the-easter-lily

 

 

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